The Side Steal

The Technical Steal The Deliberate Side Steal The Curled Forefinger The Bold Steal The Bottom Bold Steal The Bold Stop Effect The Pinch Technique Standard Side Steal On the Left Side Multiple Holdout Left Hand Side Steal Color Steal Almost Standard The Finger Flutter The Clip Steal Clip Steal to Bottom Clip Steal Color Change Palm Positions Side Steal to Bottom Multiple Rear Palm Steal To the Top Card From Case Stop Effect The Insertion Steals Full Left Hand Steal Direct Insertion Steal Right Hand Steal The Diagonal Steal Side Steal Cover Ups First Cover up Another Handling Clip Steal Cover up Dribble Stop Effect Card Stab Effect For the Purists Concluding Observations

From the title you know this is Chapter Four and it deals with the Side-Steal. We did not invent this sleight and there seems to be some doubt as to who actually did. The Art of Magic has T. Nelson Downs as the creator of the Side-Steal and even Art Buckley in his book Card Control mentions, quote, "I am informed by Mr. Hilliard's Greater Magic, page 31, that this sleight is a conception of the master manipulator, T. Nelson Downs."

Actually Hilliard wrote nothing of the sort, but instead, to quote Hilliard penned, "It was introduced into magic by T. Nelson Downs, Nate Liepzig and ray old friend, the late Harry Stork."

Now, was there a controversy among [these men over the sleight? Did each on his own independently think of the idea? Did Hilliard take the safe course and thus mention all three? One of the more interesting aspects when Down's Art of Magic was published, was the rumor that Nate Liepzig was quite put out because certain of his items from his act appeared in said book. From this, one would be inclined to deduce that Liepzig had prior claim but then, what about Harry Stork? Also let's not forget some of those present day magicians who also insist they thought of the Side-Steal all on their own without having ever seen, heard or read about same.

Regardless of who invented it, the fact remains that Art of Magic is its first source. The method, if it is Downs', is interesting because it is a Side-Steal in which the card is not actually palmed but merely or literally moved from center to top. We have stressed top because a Side-Steal to the bottom certainly must have started a new train of thought. On this approach, Art Buckley in his Card Control states having used it since 1908; however, the first time it appeared in print under Buckley's name was in 1921, then reprinted in the above book in 1946. In the same book Buckley also attempted a Top Card Cover for a Side-Steal to second from the top.

Rear Palming was experimented with bv such names as Malini, Latapie, P.W. Miller, Larsen, Wright and Tenkai; however, its application to a Side-Steal to the top appeared in Expert Card Technique. Again we have stressed top because this booklet contains the first of a bottom type.

This about covers the original sources and from all of these we have gradually developed our own techniques and ideas that we feel are superior to all others.

While there are others who have experimented with various Side-Steal methods, our own techniques differ from these in many respects due to independent research, thinking and experimentation from the basic inspirational sources already mentioned.

The listing of all possible Side-Steal techniques that may be in print we will leave to a fellow by the name of Mr. Potter who in our estimation is doing not only a wonderful job along this line with his Potter's Bar in the Linking Ring magic magazine but also deserves the thanks of all true students of magic for such compiled information on the various effects, sleights and their source. We hope one day to see Mr. Potter's research efforts in book form.

Let us now delve into the various aspects of the Side-Steal.

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