The Drop Cover

Standard methods of tip up or pivot palming of several top cards sometimes have the problem of movement of the inner left corner. This is less visible when the palm is made while the pack is transferred from hand to hand, but not if the palming action is made as the right hand appears to square the pack. Once the cards are seen to move off at the inner left corner, the palmed cards might just as well be shown. Even excessive movement of the fingers will not give away a palm as quickly as this one point. The Drop Cover principle, if properly used, will insure one against "Corner Flash"'

The Drop Cover can be used with any standard technique of palming. The principle is quite simple. It merely consists of momentarily getting the backs of the cards out of the line of spectator's vision. As an illustration, let us assume you have a break under the top four cards which you wish to palm off in the righthand.

The right hand comes over the top of the deck in a squaring motion. The left hand tilts the outer end of the deck upwards to meet the right hand.

When the hands meet, the backs of the cards will be out of line of spectator's vision. The tilt of the left hand may be slight or great depending on performing conditions.

With the deck properly angled the top cards are palmed as the hands move downward to once again bring the backs of the cards into view. It is during the downward movement of the hands, which should be more from the wrists than elbows, that the top cards are palmed in the right hand. There will be no visible movement of the lower left corner as one will see with a trial before that most patient of audiences—the mirror.

Once the cards are in the palm, the right hand assumes the position explained for the Top Palm.

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