Th Card Faro Check

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This is an idea of many years that I have used to be sure of cutting at exactly the 26 th card before proceeding into any miracles dependent on it. The idea of peeking a 26th card for a 26th card location, was a Bert Allerton subtlety that won him a prize many years ago for the best card effect at a convention.

The use of the Faro Check is my idea to insure that the 26th card is actually being used thus insuring definite success with the 26th card principle.

1. The 26th Card Faro Check consists merely in cutting the pack at 26, then starting a Faro Shuffle as in Figure 29.

1. The 26th Card Faro Check consists merely in cutting the pack at 26, then starting a Faro Shuffle as in Figure 29.

2. Remember, you only start the Faro Shuffle. If the cut and weave has been perfect, every card will be weaved with no cards left over, thus you will be sure that the cards have been cut at 26.

3. Spot the bottom card of the right hand packet and remember it.

4. As if changing you mind about a shuffle, merely pull the halves away from each other thus undoing the weave.

5. From here you can replace the upper half back on top and thus you now know the 26th card. You can also give each half to the two spectators for the Automatic Placement, later in this chapter, where both cards will end up 13th in each packet of 26.

6. Use of the 26th Card Faro Check will be evident in such effects as Faro Foolers in Chapter Seven, Faro Notes.

7. Psychologically, the 26th Card Faro Check is quite sound as it has all the elements of an attempted Faro Shuffle that did not quite come off. Your whole manner, upon completion of the 26th Card Faro Check, should be one of, "Oh, well, let's try something else."

4th Finger Table

I consider this an Faro aid. Not only does it eliminate any possible flare out of the bottom cards during the starting of the weave, but also steadies the packets as well as being a freat aid in such Faros as the Partial aro Check, Above the Crimp Faro, Off Center Faro, etc.. It is one that I constantly use in connection with the First Technique for Faro described above.

1. The pack is held in the same position as for the First Technique except that the left fourth finger moves in under the cards until it comes to rest directly beneath the joined corners of the pack.

2. The joined corners actually rest on the back or nail of the left fourth finger. The picture in Figure 30 shows how it looks from the operator's view.

Figure 30

3. Slightly moving the left fourth finger either upwards or downwards allows a better control of the start of In or Out Faros.

4. Once the Faro is started, the left fourth finger moves out of the way to join the others alongside the pack.

5. For the present, this will suffice but its usefulness will become more appa-rant further on in this work. For the present, let us now delve into the technique of the -

Faro Riffle Shuffle

Here again the techniques are strictly our own. These Faro Riffle Shuffles can be done on any type of surface which | in itself is a great step forward.

1. Hold the pack between both hands in a manner exactly to that of the First Technique.

2. Place the deck's lower end against the table thus also squaring them.

3. The right thumb breaks the side of the pack in a manner similar to Figure 2 except here the pack is upright on the table with the operator looking down at the top end.

4. Having split the side of the deck that is towards the body, you separate the halves like a book; i.e. at the back side only. The front side stays together.

5. At this stage the cards are held momentarily for comparison of one half against the other. This comparison is

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