Standard Side Steal

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There are those who work for the public and have to maintain a certain tempo. To them it is immaterial if there is a slight movement of the fingers in a Side Steal as long as the method is practical and fast. They are solely interested in getting that selected card surely, and quickly to enable them to continue with the effect at hand. For them the Standard Side Steal will fill their needs.

1. Bevel the pack, as instructed in the Technical Side Steal, Step 1.

2. Once the pack is beveled it is placed in the identical position shown in Figure 1.

3. Have a card peeked at and maintain the break with the fourth left finger as outlined in Step 3 of the Technical Side Steal.

4. At this stage the Side Steal differs in that when the right hand is placed over the pack, as shown in Figure 2, the right hand more or less hugs the deck. This is done so that the right four fingers will come down lower thus giving more cover to the front end of the pack.

5. When the hands are in the above position, the left fingers can swing downwards, opening the whole right side of the deck up to the break. This forms a sort of horizontal V opening which will be hidden by the right fingers in front. Only the bottom portion should be moved downwards while the top should remain motionless.

6. The left third finger now digs into the break as far as it can reach and presses upward and forward on the peeked card. The card will pivot at the outer end moving quickly to the right and into the right palm. Only the right thumb and right first finger should be pressing on the upper and lower left corners of the pack as this insures an easy pivoting of the peeked card.

7. The right hand now moves slightly to the right, in a squaring motion, to get the upper left corner of the card from the center of the deck. Once the corner is free the right hand moves towards the left continuing the simulated squaring movement.

8. The right hand with the palmed card can be dropped to the side or it can be immediately brought to the top by using any one of the Palm Replacements discussed in Action Palms or those described here.

On The Left Side

During the Standard Side Steal and replacement to the top of the deck, the most vulnerable angle is the left side. In other words Figure 24 shows what is usually seen on the left side during a side steal. This left side can be covered and with the method here described the cardician can actually do a Side Steal with the spectator on his left. At the same time it will be covered from the front and right side.

Figure 24

The secret consists of merely tilting the hands to the right, at a slight angle so that the spectator on the left can not see the back of the deck. Figure 25 shows what the left side will look like during the actual stealing and replacing of the card to the top of the deck.

Figure 25

Naturally the action is still covered from the right side, as well as the front. The pack is tilted to the right only from a horizontal plane. Be sure not to bring the hands upwards during the tilt. Just keep the outer and inner ends of the deck in the same plane.

Multiple Holdout

Usually, when it is desired to have four or five cards selected using the spectator peek and Side Steal, it is necessary to also make just as many replacements. For such occasions we devised a method whereby only one replacement move need be made to get all the peeked cards on top. What is more, they are always in their proper order from the top down. That is to say the first selection is on top, the second is below that, etc., up to as many cards as were noted.

The process consists of simply holding in the palm each succeeding card until the required amount is arrived at. In other words, step by step, it would work as follows:

1. Have the first spectator peek at a card. Side Steal it using either the Technical or Standard method and keep it in the palm.

2. Drop the hand with the palmed card to the side. Approach the second spectator with the request he also look at a card.

3. Side Steal the second card into the right hand. Naturally it goes below the first one already there.

4. Repeat the procedure until you have all the peeked cards in the right hand.

5. After the last card has been selected all the cards are brought to the top of the pack by the use of any of the palm replacements. The cards are also on top in their proper sequence.

A bit of practice will be required to Side Steal each succeeding card but as the advantages are worth it the time will not be wasted. As many as ten cards can thus be held out. At the same time it prevents any possible "peek" duplication by the other spectators.

Left Hand Steal

There are several factors which should make this steal a favorite. It is fast, there isn't any finger movement to the left hand, and the steal is covered from practically all sides.

1. Prepare the pack for the spectator peek as already described in the Technical Side Steal. After a card is peeked at the left fourth finger maintains the break.

2. The right hand comes over the pack to square the ends in the orthodox manner. During this time the right thumb, at the back of the deck, riffles off the peeked card, from above the little finger, onto the lower half or below the little finger. The fourth finger still holds the break after the selection is released to the lower half.

3. The right forefinger, which has been curled on top of the pack during Step 2, now joins the other fingers at the front end of the pack.

4. The pack is now shifted with the aid of the right hand, so that the lower left corner of the deck comes up near the thumb crotch. The right forefinger and second finger move around to the upper left corner. In this way the upper left corner will be between the right first and second fingers but will not show through. The position of the pack and hands is shown in Figure 26. Left fourth finger still holds the break.

5. The right hand moves the upper half of the pack, above the break, forward for about three-eights of an inch. This will enable the side of right thumb to come in contact with the top card of the lower half as in Figure 27 where the right thumb has been purposely pulled back to show the jogged condition. In actual operation the right thumb tip will be pressing against the base of the left thumb thus covering this corner. The right forefinger on the left side of the upper left corner, covers the jog on this side.

6. The upper half of the pack is now moved back to its original position. During this backward movement the side of the right thumb presses down on the top card of the lower half. The pressure of the right thumb, plus the downward action of the right hand, will cause the peeked card to pivot, against the base of the left thumb, to the right as in Figure 28 where the right hand has been omitted for clarity. The left second and third fingers curl slightly around the upper right corner of the pivoted card.

Figure 28

7. The deck is now removed from the left hand and placed on the table in the following manner: Right forefinger bends on top of the deck until its nail is pressing against the top of the deck while the right three fingers curl around the bottom or face of the deck.

In this way the pack is pinched between the right forefinger on top and right three fingers underneath at the outer end.

8. With the pack pinched as above the right hand moves upwards and forward with the complete pack as left fingers hold onto the selected card. The right thumb rides over the palmed card and stays at the back end of deck. This action is pictured in Figure 29.

9. Continuing the movement started in Step 8, the pack is placed on the table in the standard manner with the forefinger curled on top, three fingers at outer end and thumb at the back. The left hand with its palmed card has in the meantime dropped to the side.

Exaggerating the motion of placing the pack on the table will cover the dropping of the left hand to the side. Remember to move the pack upward as it clears the palmed card so as to give the appearance of having lifted the deck rather than having slid it off. Although the Left Hand Steal has been dissected into several Steps and drawings the whole process becomes as a unit in actual operation.

Color Steal

In no other type of Side Steal is there as much visible movement to the left fingers as in the Standard Color

Change wherein the bottom card is pushed into the right palm.

Any cardician desiring to learn a Color Change in which there isn't any movement to the left fingers will find the answer in the Color Steal.

1. Hold the pack face up in the left hand. The sides of pack are beveled to the right. The left forefinger should lie in a slightly diagonal line beneath the pack, its tip is at the outer right corner of the beveled pack. The remaining left finger are extended below the deck and curled very slightly around right side of the cards. Figure 30 shows the position of the left hand as seen from the bottom.

Figure 30

Figure 30

2. The right hand grasps the deck by the ends from above with all four fingers on the front end and thumb at the back.

3. The right hand moves the pack forward at the same time the tip of the left forefinger presses on the upper right corner of the bottom card. This will cause the bottom card to swing to the right, at its upper end only, until the upper left corner comes directly under the right forefinger as in Figure 31.

4. Move the right hand, back to its original position, at the same time the left forefinger exerts pressure, this time on the right side of the card. The combined movement of the right hand, plus pressure of the left forefinger, will swing the bottom card into the right palm, as in Figure 32, with the right first finger as the fulcrum point.

5. Once the bottom card is below the right palm the base of the right thumb is moved down in order to let the lower right corner of the deck slip upwards and past the thumb crotch. At this stage the card will be securely in the right palm.

6. Move the pack forwards and back once more before actually coming away with the card. Once the card is in the right hand, a color change of the face card follows.

Speaking of color changes, we have found from experience that the most effective color changes are those in which the hand seems to merely brush over the face card. It should never be seen to actually cover the card nor should it rest on the face card for any length of time.

The two forward and backward movements of the pack should appear as if the sides of the pack are merely being squared.

Note: The Color Steal can be made with the right forefinger curled on the face of the deck and using the right second fingertip as the pivot point during the actions shown in Figs. 3l and 32.

Almost Standard

This Color Steal is almost standard except for one bit of technique that insures only one card will move off the bottom of the deck as it is pushed into the right palm.

1. Hold the deck in an identical position to that of the Color Steal, Figure 30, Step 1.

2. The right hand comes above deck so that all four fingers are at the front end and thumb at the back end.

3. Immediately the left forefinger tip presses up on the outer right corner of the bottom card. At the same time the left forefinger moves to the right causing the bottom card to swing to the right at its upper end in a manner similar to Figure 31 except in this case the deck is not moved only the left forefinger moves.

4. The above preliminary brings the upper left corner of the card directly under the right forefinger tip, again as in Figure 31, which presses on the card to keep it in place between the right forefinger and right thumb.

5. Steps 3 and 4 have insured that on the next move you will get only the one card. With bottom card in the angled position held between the right forefinger and right thumb it leaves the left third finger free to move to the center of the bottom card placing the tip of the left third finger against the card. At this point the left third fingertip straightens out pushing the bottom card into the right palm in a manner similar to Figure 32 except in this case there is movement of the left third finger plus the others as the bottom card is forced further into the palm.

6. With the card almost in the palm but still partly under the deck the right forefinger curls on top of the deck. The right hand then moves the pack back and forth as the left thumb runs along the left side of the pack in a squaring gesture.

7. The deck is then replaced in the left hand so that the upper left corner of the deck can be pinched between the left thumb and the base of the left forefinger thus giving the right hand a chance to move away with the bottom card. As the right hand is ready to go away with its palmed card remember to casually straighten out the right forefinger which has been curled on top of the deck so far.

The Finger Flutter

During the course of stealing the bottom card for a color change, one of the big faults is the flutter of the left four fingers on the side of the deck as the hand with the palmed card moves away. This is due to the fact that the left fingers push the bottom card out but have no chance to get back alongside of the deck until the bottom card is carried away and by this time the side of the deck is exposed and the fingers can be seen to move in alongside of the deck thus causing a noticeable flutter. Here then are several ways to avoid such a tell-tale action.

Method One:

1. Anytime the right hand with a palmed card moves away any great distance from the pack be sure that the left fingers remain extended as shown from the right side in Figure 33. A remark such as, "Watch closely" will cover the gesture of the right hand.

Figure 33

Figure 33

2, Two alternatives are open now. The right hand can come over and do the Color Change immediately while at the same time the left fingers move alongside of the deck. The result is that not only has the card been changed but the left fingers are in place along the deck and the movement has not been seen.

3. The other alternative is to get the right hand to take the deck from above, right forefinger curled on the face, and lift it into the Two Hand Square Up position.

4. Do the Square-Up, then replace the deck into the left hand where of course, the left four fingers now occupy the proper position at the right side of the deck. The right hand moves away, card still palmed, to rest at the waist.

5, The right hand now comes over the deck to do the Color Change. Apparently no left finger flutter was evident at any time.

Method Two:

In this case the mere attention to not moving the right hand away from the deck, other than just enough to clear the bottom card, will afford ample cover for the left fingers to move back alongside of the deck once the card is inrightpalm.

Method Three:

This makes use of a Wrist Turn with the left hand. This is used either as a preliminary motion to the color change or, apparently as the means by which the change is accomplished when in reality such is not the case. The method of getting the card into the right palm can be standard or any other type. In any case the right hand does not move away from the deck. Instead, the left hand turns at the wrist bringing the back of the left hand upwards momentarily as viewed from the right side in Figure 34.

Naturally the Wrist Turn not only clears the pack of the card palmed in the right hand but also gives excellent cover for the left fingers to move in alongside the deck. When the left hand turns upward to show the face of the deck, the four left fingers are motionless against the side of the deck. The right hand can now brush over face of deck, leaving the palmed card to show a color change.

Figure 34

Figure 34

Method Four:

Sometimes when it doesn't make any difference as to what card is used for a color change, the following technique effectively covers the finger flutter.

It consists merely of breaking the pack somewhere near the center and doing the Standard Side Steal. The left fingers push out the card from the center, or slightly above center, into the right palm. At this stage part of the card will be in the palm and part of it still in the deck. At this point the left four fingers move back to take their place alongside the pack but below the card that is to be side stolen.

The right hand can now move away with its palmed card and as it does, the left four fingers will be seen alongside of the deck with no one noticing that they are slightly lower on the side than usual. Later the right hand brushes over face of deck to execute the color change.

It will be noted that we have given no particular techniques for the actual Color Change Replacement as this will constitute an entirely different chapter in the future. Suffice it to again remind the card student that the most effective changes are those in which the hand seems to merely brush over the face card. It must appear as if the hand never even really covered the card and by all means the hand should not rest on the face card for any length of time.

The Clip Steal

Probably the first printed record of clipping the upper right corner of a card between the third and fourth fingers was in Buckley's Triple Climax printed in August, 1921. Buckley used it to bring a peeked card to the bottom of the pack in his Bottom Shift.

For many years this was one of our first and only methods of bringing a selected card to the bottom but as the years went on we developed other methods of getting a peeked card to the bottom, which are described below. In addition, also having changed the finger position at which the upper right corner of the card was clipped.

In 1945 we showed the following Side Steal, that used the Clip Steal, to Russell Barnhardt and Bod Nelson of Chicago. Today, 1957, it is still a favorite of Bob Nelson and as deceptive now as it was back in 1945.

1. Assume that you have had a card peeked at and are holding the usual break with the left fourth finger. The right hand comes over the deck in a manner similar to Figure 2 with all four right fingers covering the front end, This brings the base of the right third and fourth fingers near the upper right corner of the deck. The right hand should remain more or less arched over the deck.

2. Next the left fingers swing the whole right side of the deck, up to the break downwards. This forms a horizontal V opening which will be hidden by the right fingers at the front end of the deck.

3. The left second and third fingers now enter into this opening as far as they can reach, then press upward and to the right on the peeked card so that it comes out straight as possible to the right side.

4. As the card is pushed straight to the right, the upper right corner of this card is forced between the right fourth and third fingers at their base as

shown in Figure 35 which is a view of the action from below.

5. Do not separate the right third and fourth fingers when getting this card into this Clip Position. Instead, the fingers are kept close together and the corner of the card is more or less forced between them until the right fingers feel they have a firm grip on the card's corner.

6. Once the card is gripped properly, the right hand turns so this thumb is uppermost. At this stage the right hand is still close to the deck and the situation is pictured in Figure 36 where the clipped card is also clearly seen as being still in the deck.

7. The right hand now moves forward in a sort of gesture as it secretly takes the clipped card along. At the same time the performer turns slightly to the left. Also the left thumb moves across

the back of the deck as the the right hand moves forward to gesture with its secretly clipped card. The position of both hands is seen in Figure 37. Note that right forefinger is slightly extended during gesture.

8. The gesture of the right hand is covered with some remark such as "Don't forget your card" or "Do you remember your card?" or some such appropriate remark suited to the occasion at hand.

9. Now the right hand comes back towards the deck and as it does the clipped card automatically goes under the left thumb across the deck as in Figure 38.

10. As the action in Figure 38 is continued, the clipped card will go flush with the left side of the deck. This will automatically bring the right hand into position for squaring the ends of the deck, which it does. The right hand

as in Figure 39 at which point the right hand removes the deck from the left hand and slaps it onto the table.

11. The whole replacement of the card blends into the mere taking of the deck with the right hand. Add to that the fact that the left thumb is across the deck as the right hand returns and you have what to the onlooker seems like an impossibility of adding a card to the top of the deck.

Clip Steal To Bottom

1. To get the card to the bottom of the deck via the Clip Steal proceed as already outlined for that sleight from Steps 1 to 8 and as per Figures 35, 36 and 37 with one exception. The left thumb must remain at the upper left corner of deck not across the deck.

2. The right hand is now about to make its return trip to the pack and as it does so the deck is pinched mainly between left thumb and base of left forefinger thus leaving all four fingers free to extend from the deck when it becomes necessary to do so.

3. As the right hand returns with its card, just as it covers the deck the left fingers extend and the clipped card is directed under the deck as in Figure 40.

4. The upper left corner of the clipped card should have been slipped directly above the left forefinger so that now, as the deck is lifted into a Two Hand

Square Up Position, the left forefinger naturally carries the clipped card under the pack as this left forefinger curls in under the deck for the square up.

5. After the Square Up the pack is placed on the table with the selected card, now on the bottom, to be used in the effect at hand.

Clip Steal Color Change

For this all you need do is follow the exact mechanics of the Clip Steal to the top except have the deck face up when you do them. You will be surprised at the reaction; however, the following technical improvements make the change even more startling.

1. In this case the right hand is above deck as in Figure 2 but with right forefinger curled on the face of the deck, Remember the deck is face up during a color change.

2. The left fingers gently push the tom card to the right at the same time the right hand rotates slightly to bring the deck from a horizontal plane to a 45 degree angle. This double action enables the bottom card to glide gently over the bottom right long edge of the deck. At the same time the upper right corner of the bottom card goes between the right third and fourth fingers at their base into the Clip Position.

3. At this stage the left hand can move away so that the right hand seems to be holding the deck alone when in real-

CLIP STEAL COLOR CHANGE

ity a card is also in Clip Position as shown in Figure 41.

4, The left hand now comes back to the

4, The left hand now comes back to the

The left hand squares the sides of the deck and moves it upwards further, squares the sides again, then takes the deck.

5. The left hand has taken the deck by the sides with the tip of the left thumb at the center of the left side and tips of the four left fingers at right side. The deck is thus held on its sides with the face card facing audience. The right hand has receded towards the body to about waist height.

6. The right hand now gestures towards the face of the deck while slightly spreading the first and second fingers keeping the third and fourth as a unit. The gesture is accompanied by the remark, 'Watch the_

here name the face card of the deck.

7. The right hand now approaches the deck until the left side of the clipped card is against the tip of the left thumb at the top side of the deck as in Figure 43 where you will note that the card is also more or less in line with the deck.

8. All that remains is for the right thumb and fingers to move in against the sides of the deck, then move downwards along these sides. This will cause the clipped card to fold onto the face of the deck and at the same time become disengaged from the clip of third and fourth fingers.

9. The above change can also be made by holding deck face up in left hand dealing position at about waist high with the face of the card towards the ceiling. To make the change the clipped card in right hand is brought forward and down onto the face of the deck to effect the change in a manner similar to Vernon's Softy.

It may be well to keep the Basic Clip, i.e., between base of third and fourth fingers, in mind as other uses for it will be detailed later when we come to substitutes for the Side Steal

One more point of interest regarding the Clip. After the card is clipped as shown in Figure 41 the right third fingertip can reach over to the upper left corner and, by pressing on it, the card will now be held by pressure of the right third fingertip at upper left corner and at the base of the third and fourth fingers.

This may be useful at times when a firmer control of the card is desired. By exerting pressure inwards with the right third fingertip, the clipped card can be made to move further along into the palm.

Palm Positions

Before going into the various techniques of side stealing a card to the bottom of the deck it is best if we first describe the position of the palmed card as this is most important in each case. Later we will describe how these positions are obtained.

First Palm Position:

In this case the card must be obtained by the right hand so that the outer right corner is held or pressed by the right fourth fingertip. The whole right edge of the card is slightly curved and lies along the line of the right fourth finger until the card's inner right corner ends by being pressed into the base of the right palm. The inner left corner of the card is pressed against the flesh or folds of right thumb just below its second crease. The whole front end of the card and its left side is away from the palm thus the card is actually gripped at three corners; the

Figure 44

upper right corner and lower right and left corners as shown in Figure 44 which is a bottom view while Figure 45 is a left side view.

Second Palm Position:

In this case the card is held so that its outer right corner is at the right fourth fingertip while its inner left corner is pressed at the first crease of the thumb. The whole right side of the card runs at an upward angle starting at right fourth fingertip and terminating at the center of the palm. The back of the right hand faces almost full to the audience on the right while the palmed card is at a 90 degree angle in relation to the palm itself. Figure 46 shows the position of the card from the bottom while Figure 47 shows the left side view of the hand.

Figure 46

Figure 44

Figure 47

Third Palm Position:

In this case the right thumb does most of the holding of the card as its second joint comes over the left side of the card but near the inner left corner. The inner right corner is automatically pressed into the base of the palm. The card's right side runs along the side of the palm and ends with its outer right corner at the middle of the second joint of the right fourth finger. The back of the right hand in this case is more or less curved over the card, not as in the Second Palm Position. The Figure 48 shows the bottom view of the hand holding the card while Figure 49 shows the left side view. Naturally the audience on the right can see nothing.

Figure 49

Fourth Palm Position:

We refer to this Fourth Position as the Mario Position in that while it is a Rear Palm it differs greatly from the one in Expert Card Technique as well as the Tenkai Palm. As a matter of fact, only with the Mario Position is an easy replacement to either the top or bottom of the deck possible as will be seen.

For the Mario Position the card is hooked at the center of the left side by the side of the right thumb against the inner phalanx, or, just under the large bone comprising the first joint. Pressure exerted by the right thumb holds the whole right side edge of the card against the right palm.

The right side of the card runs from the base of the right fourth finger, diagonally, up to the center of the palm. The inner right edge of the card practically rests in the large crease at the center of the palm near the wrist. The whole of the right thumb, which appears like a chicken leg, is above the back of the card and touching it only at the center of the left side. The Figure 50 shows the bottom view of the Mario Position while Figure 51 shows the left side view.

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Fundamentals of Magick

Fundamentals of Magick

Magick is the art and practice of moving natural energies to effect needed or wanted change. Magick is natural, there is absolutely nothing supernatural about it. What is taught here are various techniques of magick for beginners. Magick is natural and simple and the techniques to develop abilities should be simple and natural as well. What is taught on this site is not only the basics of magick, but the basics of many things.

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