Miracle Estimation Peek

Effect In this, after the spectator has peeked the card, he is handed the deck to shuffle. Performer takes back the deck, looks it over, then holding it face down starts to take one card at a time into the other hand as he requests spectator to call Stop Needless to say that spectator stops at his peeked card. 1. Have 5 cards of one suit in order on top of the deck. As an example, suppose these are Ace to Five of Clubs from top down. Before proceeding, shuffle eleven cards onto the set of 5...

Throw Off Faro Bottom

This is used when the needed card is somewhere in the bottom half of the deck. It must be pointed out that In and Out Shuffles need not be restricted to only from the top down calculations but also from the bottom up. Hold the pack as in Figure 1. With right hand, undercut the bottom portion of the deck and weave it into the larger portion as in Figure 62. 2. The right hand comes over the deck in a manner similar to Figure 63 except here the right thumb at the back, pulls the injogged packet up...

S F Second Deals

As the second card moves further out the left thumb moves the top card back flush with the deck. 6. The arcing of the top card is done only when dealing a second otherwise all top cards are taken as explained in connection with the S. F. Bottom Deal. 1. Again hold the deck in the S. F. Grip but this time the left thumb openly arcs the top card over to the left thus exposing the second card at the upper rigntcorner. 2. The right thumb and forefinger come over and actually grasp the top card at...

Angle Palm Transfer

Having Angle Palmed a card it can very easily be transferred to the left hand which takes it into a Rear Palm position. Also the reverse is possible. That is a Rear Palmed card in the left hand can be transferred into a right hand Angle Palm. Just study Figure 40 and imagine the action either way. From Angle Palm in the right to Rear Palm in the left. From Rear Palm in the left to Angle Palm in the right. in passing, we might mention that a Flat Palmed card...

Four and Four Transposition

Start with four Aces on top of the deck. Below them four spot cards, two black and two red, with an 8 of Hearts as the lowest of the four. Below this, have the 7 of Hearts as the ninth card from the top. 2. Thumb off the four Aces and show them in a fan in the right hand. Drop them face down on the table. 3. Show the next four cards, the spot cards, in a fan but in returning them get a break under them with left 4th finger. Patter about using four Aces and four spot cards. 4. Pick up the Aces...

One Hand Palm As Action Palm

The card to be palmed is on the bottom or face of the deck. The deck is held in the right hand in readiness for an overhand shuffle but also in the position necessary for a One-Hand Palm. 2. Start to shuffle the cards into the left hand and when a few cards have been thus shuffled off, stop momentarily to make some appropriate remark. 3. During the above slight stall, the One Hand Palm is made and the shuffle immediately continued. Figure 24 shows the action and position of both hands as the...

The Technical Steal

Although there have been many excellent techniques devised in relation to the Side Steal we sincerely believe that the ones here described have several points in their favor which the others do not possess. First, there is absolutely no visible movement to the left fingers. Even at the crucial point, of pressing the stolen card into the right palm, the left fingers remain motionless. Second, the high arched right hand over the pack as compared to the close, almost flat, position in the standard...

Another Rear Palm Switch

A method for switching one or more cards through the use of the Rear Palm. The switch is made as follows 1. The card, or cards, are held in the left Rear Palm as in Figure 112. The cards are held lengthwise between the base of the thumb and the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers which leaves the left forefinger free as the cards are below it. 3. Some appropriate gesture is now made with the right hand or some objects, such as the deck, is moved. 4. The right hand comes back to take the cards from the...

Switcheroo

This is a utility Switch that I devised to enable one to switch either one card or several. It is easy of execution, requires only a slight amount of practice and has endless possibilities some of which will be pointed out. For the present I will describe the mechanics of the Switch itself however, first, let me point out that although the moves can be made with the pack face down there is less suspicion if the pack is face up during the Switch while the tabled card or cards are face down....

Card Switches

Rear Flat Palm Rear Angle Palm Thumb Clip Palm Latest Thumb Clip Palm Changing Palm Positions Flat Card Pickup Rear Angle Palm To Flat Rear Palm Flat Rear Palm To Rear Angle Palm Getting Into The Palm Positions Methods of Unloading The X Card After The Switch The Flexible Unload Suggestions The Card Switch Transfer Single Card Switches An Impressive Sequence A Simpler Sequence A Third Sequence Further Alignment Move Switches Variations of the First Switch Mario's Card Switch Additional Methods...

Direct Rear Palm

In general appearance this sleight looks as if you merely transferred the top card to the bottom of the deck, or packet, then immediately placed the cards on the table. In the action the card, or cards, are palmed. Our first example will be that as if used with a small packet of cards such as in an Ace effect. 1. A packet of five cards, but presumably four, are held face down in the left hand. The bottom card is the Ace, 2. Count the cards as four, faces down, reversing them so that the Ace...

The Side Push Off Second

One of the first methods of second dealing using the Side Push-Off was the second method in Erdnase. It was among the first I ever learned and over the years 1 have found it to be one of the most psychologically deceptive methods in existence. You will note I said psychologically as from a visual standpoint of the See if you can see it come out type this one wouldn't rate at the top however, for a completely disarming method this one can't be beat. It has almost none of the usual tipoffs of a...

Marlo One Hand Second

Down on the deck to keep the top card in place as the left thumb moves out further to the left dragging the second card with it, as shown in Figure 132. 9. The action of the left thumb continues to the left while pressing downwards against the upper left corner of the deck. This downward pressure against the corner of the deck causes the second card to flip out from under the top card and end up in the same position as the top card normally would as already shown in Figure 127, 10. Naturally...

Info

In seeming to bury one card you actually bury two as one. Namely, the short card and the one you want forced. This is done with the second set. The cards to be noted are now already knvwn, of course, so the deck can be handed out to be immediately shuffled. From here the proceedure depends onthe effect one had in mind to begin with. FOURTH METHOD In the absence of corner shorts the method here described will be found ideal and perhaps, for the more skilled cardicians, preferable as it embodies...

Concluding Observations

Although Erdnase himself does not mention that his sleight be used in that way, and that of Jerry Andrus, who also has a special technique for twisting out a block of Aces to the top of the deck, there seems to be no other) and second, whatever methods are around in his day he found apparently not very practical or deceptive. The ones in this chapter are both practical and deceptive and the underlying techniques, for each, original with me. Most approaches to the Multiple Shift are what I call...

Progressive Miracle

Effect Cardician locates a card that has been selected under somewhat stringent conditions. The effect id repeated several times. How It Appears To The Audience Tht Cardician shuffles the deck which is then handed to a spectator. Performer turns his back while the spectator cuts the pack as often as he likes or until he is satisfied that the magician couldn't possibly know the top card of the deck after the cut. This card is noted by spectator and placed into the center ol the deck after which...

Angle Palm Steal

Deck is in the same position of Figure 9 in front of the performer except the right hand is not near the deck at this time. 2. The right hand comes over to touch the deck as in Figure 12. Note that the right thumb is at the center on the left side of the card and the base of the hand is alongside the whole length of the deck. 3. The position of Figure 12 is only momentary as the right thumb moves in to clip the card against the base of the palm, the hand then coming away from the deck. The card...

Mechanical Estimation

The Comparison Method The Automatic Gauge Method Variation of Automatic Gauge The Nail Gauge Nail Gauge Variation Mario's Favorite The Faro Check Mechanical Estimation Effects The Magic Card Think I'll Stop Here Chosen Card Count Down The Tipoff Reversed Card Out Probably the first source to record the principle of Estimation is Downs' Art of Magic where it is looked upon as a simple process of locating a card but the reader is cautioned that, The bungling and unobservant perfomer will meet his...

Multiple Rear Palm Steal

The action started in Figure 63 is continued until the left and right thumbs meet at inner the left corner of the deck as in Figure 64. 6. When the card reaches the position shown in Figure 64, the left third finger pivots the card out slightly to the right using the right thumb as the pivot point. This slight pivoting action brings the right side of the card out of the deck. Figure 65 is a bottom view with the left hand omitted to give a clear picture of the card's position. 7. The deck is now...

Variation Magical Table

The left forefinger is at position 1 around the upper end of the deck. The left thumb is angled towards the top end of the deck where its tip touches the left forefinger. The left 2nd 3rd and 4th fingertips are against the side of the deck. The position is shown in Figure 94. 2. The left thumb now arcs over the top card, as shown in Figure 95, just enough to expose the second card at the upper right corner. 3. The right forefinger is now extended and its tip...

Pivot Bottom Steal

The usual method of side stealing the bottom card, into the right hand, is to hold the packet from above with the right hand while the left fingers push the bottom card into the right palm. It is this pushing and straightening of the left fingers that almost always tips off the move. Several methods of handling have been devised to overcome or cover up the movement of the left fingers, but the technique described here is by far superior to any other methods. 1. A packet of five cards with an...

Count Cop and Transfer

This is a good example of the use of the Count Cop without going to the pocket with the card, instead adding it to another packet. At first this may sound bold since the palmed card projects from out of the hand. If, however, these directions are followed carefully, the practitioner will soon realize the practicality of the combination. To describe it, we will use a transposition effect. 1. A card is selected and controlled to the top of the deck. 2. Two packets of ten cards each are counted...

Count Cop For The Left Hand

At times it will be necessary to palm cards counted into the left hand. If one were to count the cards in the same way there would be a definite awkwardness unless one were naturally left handed. So a slight change is made in the method of handling to create a fairly normal look. This method is used by confirmed poker players to mix their hand before to looking at the cards. 1. Assuming you wish to palm off the top card of a packet of five cards, hold the face down packet of five cards with the...

Delayed Action Palm

The right third finger and thumb maintain their grip. The deck can now be taken away from the left hand and held by the right hand alone as in Figure 7 which shows a bottom view of the conditions. 12. The right hand, with its cards in the position shown in Figure 7, moves towards the table as if to put the pack down however, the performer seems to spot a speck of dirt. He replaces the deck into the left hand in such a manner that the bottom angled cards will go into the left palm position....

Shuffle Palm

Tin left thumb should move over to the upper left corner of its palmed cards and press down on this corner. The left thumb should move into the corner position as soon as the right hand starts to take the pack away. The action is shown in Figure 4. Note the position of the left thumb on its palmed packet. Note It is how the cards are placed into the left hand, at Step 3, that controls the protrusion of this corner from the angle palm position. Run a few cards off into the left hand and buckle...

In and Out Faro Shuffles

Before continuing, I must mention that the technical terms In and Out, as applied to a Faro Shuffle, were introduced by Alex Elmsley. Briefly, they mean just this An In Shuffle is one in which the original top and bottom cards change position to second from the top and second from the bottom. The twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh cards, the top and bottom cards of the two packets just cut, become the new top and bottom cards of the deck. In this way each In Shuffle keeps changing the top and...

Rise RiseRise Second Method

The effect and the procedure is exactly the same except that a Flat Palm Steal is used in place of an Angle Palm. 1. Proceed exactly as per first method from Step 1 through 4. 2. Having placed the pack face down, show the right hand empty and wave it over the pack as you say, By merely waving my hand over the deck I will cause the AS to come to the top through the Three of Clubs. 3. Again wave the hand as you say, Watch. Stop and Side Square the pack with both hands, then immediately the right...

Traveling Double

Effect The spectator selects a card from one-half the deck while the cardi-cian selects one from the opposite half, Both cards are buried into the center of one half of the deck which in turn is covered by the remaining half. The two cards are now caused to travel to the top of the deck. The above effect also uses a form of Tabled Lift that we have used since 1942 in connection with a Deuce Transposition effect from Amazing, Isn't It with A1 Leech being one of our initial spectators. 1. Before...

Adjustment Misdirection

9, Obviously this leaves the whole left side open for the right thumb to move in and clip the card against the right palm with about an inch of the upper right side of the card coming between the right fourth and third fingers. 10. If the above position in Step 9 is obtained, it will be found that by moving the right thumb in against the right forefinger, the card will become Flat Palmed in a position similar to Figure 11 ofThe Flat Palm Steal. 10. Another advantage to using the Left Hand Grip...

Correction

In Expert Card Technique, a mention is made of the Chart of 17. The 48 cards mentioned and the 17 cards apart is in error. Also, it is erroneous for 52 cards as there are 17 cards between the last card at the bottom and first card at the top after that, there are only 16 cards between 1st and 2nd cards and 2nd and 3rd cards in the chain of three. have the exact number of cards between each card of a set of three, you need to use an odd number of cards such as 51 cards and an Out Shuffle by...

The Side Steal

The Technical Steal The Deliberate Side Steal The Curled Forefinger The Bold Steal The Bottom Bold Steal The Bold Stop Effect The Pinch Technique Standard Side Steal On the Left Side Multiple Holdout Left Hand Side Steal Color Steal Almost Standard The Finger Flutter The Clip Steal Clip Steal to Bottom Clip Steal Color Change Palm Positions Side Steal to Bottom Multiple Rear Palm Steal To the Top Card From Case Stop Effect The Insertion Steals Full Left Hand Steal Direct Insertion Steal Right...

The Simple Shift

Tion as you will lose the casualness of the whole sleight. 4. With the cards held face up in the left hand as for dealing, see Figure 95, the left thumb presses on the face of the pack so as to cause a slight pressure between the thumb and base of the 1st finger. 5, With pressure applied, merely push in the Aces with the left forefinger. You will find the Aces will go in, but will plunge out a center portion of the pack at the inner end as in Figure 96. 6. On examining the deck at this stage,...

To The Top Shift

Once the Aces are towards the rear of the deck, as per Figure 105, the right hand lowers the deck into the left hand so that the jogged corners of the Aces come in at about the left thumb crotch. The approximate position of the deck is seen in Figure 106 with the right hand omitted. You will know if you have the correct position when you try the next moves. Note that the left thumb is along the left side of the deck. The deck is also forward in the hand more than usual. 5. With deck as in...

Direct Full Palm

Hold the deck in regular Mechanic's Grip Dealing position. 2. Turn the top card face up as per the effect at hand. 3. Turn this card face down as you seem to place it to the bottom of the deck but, actually, the card goes into a Full Palm as follows. 4. The card is taken by the right side at its corner with the right hand. 5. The left hand pinches the upper left corner of the deck between the left thumb and the base of the forefinger. All four left fingers straighten out, ostensibly to receive...

Reverse or Backward Faro

This is the usual process of taking a packet of cards and jogging the cards upwards and downwards as shown in Figure 72. 2. Figure 72 shows the beginning of what you may perhaps term a Reverse Faro of the In Shuffle type because the lower packet will later be stripped out and placed on top of the outjogged cards thus losing the original top card. 3. To start a Reverse Faro of the In Shuffle type, begin by normally dealing over the top card with left thumb. 4. The right fingers, thumb on top,...

Effect with the Misdirection Palm

As has been pointed out previously, this type of palm has absolutely no logic unless its application makes it appear normal. The Selected Card To Pocket routine that follows shows its application. It is one of our favorite routines. 1. Previous to the routine, the right coat or trouser pocket has two cards. These are put there either by palming or when no one is looking. Both cards face inwards towards the body. 2. Have a card selected or peeked at, then control it to the top by means of the...

The Cull Palm

While looking over the faces of the deck to apparently ascertain if all the cards are there, any certain card or cards may be palmed out. The action is described assuming we wish to palm out the four Aces from a deck which has just been handed to the cardician. 1. The pack is spread, face up, between both hands however, the position of the hands is most important especially the right hand. The pack is spread between both hands in such a manner that the forefingers of both hands will be showing...

Tabled Riffle Palm

This type of Table Palm was first shown to Russell Barnhardt in 1946 and its sole object was to palm off a card, or cards, into either hand while merely squaring the pack after a riffle shuffle, it is thoroughly practical and with practice can be undetectable. 1. The card or cards to be palmed are on top of the deck. 2. The deck is lying on the table face down with its short end towards operator. 3. The top half of the deck is cut to either the left or right depending on which hand is to do the...

Th Card Faro Check

This is an idea of many years that I have used to be sure of cutting at exactly the 26 th card before proceeding into any miracles dependent on it. The idea of peeking a 26th card for a 26th card location, was a Bert Allerton subtlety that won him a prize many years ago for the best card effect at a convention. The use of the Faro Check is my idea to insure that the 26th card is actually being used thus insuring definite success with the 26th card principle. 1. The 26th Card Faro Check consists...

Mario Miracle Stop Stab

Probably the first one to stab a card by estimation was Bert Allerton in which he used a setup deck. I worked out the first impromptu methods one of which was the Mario Miracle, as submitted for D'Amico's Deviltries but the first method to appear in print was that described in the Spade book. To anyone having experience with either the set-up or impromptu version it becomes evident that if the card happens to fall into 26th or 13th, from the top or bottom, the stab becomes simpler especially if...

Marios Favorite

The Out used in the Mental Stab Miracle is the one I originally described in The New Phoenix., 329. The one to be detailed here is similar to the Out used in Mental Stab when the selection is above the indicator card however, the handling is always the same, just as if the indicator card was above the selection whether the selection is to the left or right of the indicator. 1. Assume you have placed a face up indicator into the pack and are now holding the pack facing you in readiness to spread...

Deliberate Side Steal

There are many instances where it is necessary to get a peeked card to the top of the pack. The usual process of first getting the card into the palm, then on top of the deck would be considered cumbersome therefore the following technique will be found not only effective but ind tectable under the closest scrutiny. In fact the whole seems to be the mere action of squaring the deck. Again we emphasize the arch of the hand as against the flat appearance. Proceed as in The Technical Steal from...

The Reverse Or Backward Faro

Many years ago I discussed with Martin Gardner the possibilities of what I chose to call the Backward or Reverse Faro. This was the usual process of taking a packet of cards and jogging one inwards, one outwards, one inwards, one outwards etc., until the whole packet was thus run through. The result was that some cards were injogged and some were outjogged. The injogged cards are then stripped out and placed on top of the others. In my experiments, I found that using the Backward Faro, a small...

Streamlined Dunbury Delusion

Do a Swing Cut of the upper half into the left, (same as a Mario running cut except done once). 3. Say, I'm going to find your card by mathematics.' 4. With the right hand portion you tip over the top card of the left hand portion, the selection, face up onto the left hand portion. The left thumb aids by dealing this card off the side so that the right hand portion can kick it over to the left. 5. Left thumb pushes the face up card over the side again, while the portion of the deck in the right...

The Deep Bottom Deal

Need not depend on any visual deception or speed. This one is taken from a routine of mine I call Never Miss. 1. Have a card selected and control it to the top of the deck. 2. Hand the deck to a spectator to deal cards face down into your left hand. After he has dealt about a half dozen cards tell him that he can stop dealing at any time he wishes. cards using one hand throughout, as you ask if he is sure he wants to stop now, etc. 4. His decision having been made ask him to name his card. At...

The Shuffle Palm

In this method any number of cards, from one and up, can be bottom palmed immediately following an overhand shuffle. It is an angle palm and therefore very suitable for platform work however, under certain conditions, depending on the misdirection, it can be done close up and completely surrounded. 1. Assuming you wish to palm out the four Aces begin by having them on top of the pack. 2. Hold the deck in the right hand in readiness for an overhand shuffle. 3. Shuffle off the first four cards,...

Square Up Drop Palm

During the side squaring of the deck the bottom cards are palmed in the left hand. 1. Assume you want to bottom palm the four bottom cards. Obtain a break above them and this break is transferred to the right thumb which maintains it at the inner end. 2. The cards are now brought up to the fingertips into the Square Up Position shown in Figure 32 of this chapter. 3. Now the right hand slides the deck back and forth so that the left thumb and fingers rub along the sides. 4. During this movement,...

Delayed One Hand Palm

The card booklet called Off the Top describes a one-hand top palm for several cards and while it is a good palm, its chief fault was the position of the right fingers as the pack was dropped on the table. That is, all four fingers were at the front end of the pack. In order to off-set this, the following handling was thought out. The usual procedure for doing the one-hand top palm is to take the pack in the right hand and in placing it on the table, the top card is palmed off. Naturally, the...