Written On Triangles A To H

On one side, each square flap was colored a different color with crayon ( Fig.693). On the other side, each triangle was numbered randomly from 1 to 8 and also given the symbol of a card suit -(Fig. 694). The underside of each small triangle (Fig. 695) bore a statement such as I love you, I hate you, You are a dummy, and so on, making eight statements in all. To work the device, insert the fingers as in operating the bug catcher. Ask the subject to pick one of the four colors. You now alternate...

Comments And Additions

The Latin cross is easily obtained in border form by folding an oblong sheet three times before making a straight cut. Same fold and cut, using a square sheet, produces a Greek cross, and if the cut is made at different angle, a Maltese cross results. The three forms are given on p. 205 of Houdini's Paper Magic. Interior crosses of the three types all require four folds (see Loe's book p. 13f. c. Ladder. See NEWSPAPER, No. 15. d. Letters. The cutting of square-shaped letters, either...

Right

Then separated (spectator still holding firmly to the fingertip he selected), but he always has some finger other than the middle one. Reason middle finger of right is bent down into the palm, a fact concealed in front by the left fingers. The tip marked A is actually tip of left pinkie, which rests along side of right ring finger, and is bent upward so the tip is visible. Eventually, spectator will grasp tip of your left pinkie. When your hands separate, and he finds himself holding finger of...

B

A favorite of Nate COMMENTS AND ADDITIONS Leipzig, shown to me by Vernon, and described here for first time, with Vernon's permission. The ends are crossed as in Fig. 377. The small Date- loop is held horizontally, so the picture is a view of hands from above. Right thumb and forefinger hold the crossing. Note that right second and third fingers curl through the loop. Left thumb and middle finger grasp cloth at point X. The left index is shown in readiness for pushing...

Face Eyes Borrow And Mouth

Cover small table with cloth large enough to reach floor on all sides. Someone lies flat on his back, under table, his head projecting beneath cloth (Fig. 218). Drape cloth so it covers his chin, mouth, nose. With lipstick paint a nose and mouth on his forehead. The result is weird - a head apparently severed from the body. His hair forms a beard, the eyebrows make grotesque tufts beneath the eyes. When eyes are winked, and rolled from side to side, effect is particularly...

G480

DIRECTION of pull i a away from back of l hand 12. Right hand is held palm up and knife is placed across the Fingers. Hand is slowly tilted until almost vertical (Fig. 480) but knife does not fall. Secret lies in the bulge or ridge at base of blade. This ridge rests on little finger. Only knives of right shape and weight are suitable. 13. Knife is suspended as in Fig. 481. It is kept in place by pressure of First and fourth fingers working against pressure from second and third fingers. If a...

Penetrations

Hank is placed across spectator's wrist (Fig. 344). Ends are brought beneath and apparently crossed. Actually, tip of right index presses at point A, forming a loop around which left hand wraps hank (Fig. 345). This happens rapidly and gives good illusion of ends being crossed beneath wrist, then brought up again. A double knot is tied above wrist (Fig. 346). Right hand grasps knot, while left goes below to free the loop. Jerk up with right hand. Hank appears to penetrate wrist. A larger...

N

Pands air inside glass, lifting it slightly. This reduces friction on brim, permitting glass to slide. 19. Hold a thick glass loosely, as in Fig. 242. If a half dollar is pounded vigorously with lower edge of glass, it makes a loud racket, but glass will not break. State that this is a test for counterfeit money. Pound coin a few times. Put glass aside and pick up coin, remarking, And if the coin doesn't break, you know it's good. 20. If a heavy, cheap glass is dropped on a hard floor so it...

Arm

Vaudeville Stunt

Right hand taps at point X. At this instant the left arm flexes to Fig. 5. Tap back of wrist, flexing hand to Fig. 6. Right hand now twists hand to Fig. 7. Pretend this final twist is painful as though made in wrong direction. 3. Hold left arm as shown (Fig. 8). Arm is held loose. Right hand pushes it several times, causing it to swing like a pendulum, then a harder push sends it around in a complete circle (Fig.9). This has long been a favorite of Red...

Under Cellophane

Loosen the little flap of cellophane at one end of wrapper. Rub left finger on sleeve to generate static, then hold it above cigar (Fig. 65). Flap rises mysteriously. Accomplished by squeezing slightly on lower end of cigar. 12. Remove wrapper by sliding cigar out of one end. Twist other end so it is tightly closed, and hold vertically (Fig. 66), When upper end is lit, smoke will travel downward filling the wrapper. 13. Magician pulls cellophane from borrowed cigar. It keeps coming, until...

Cigarette Lighter

Park lighters have wind guard which makes possible a startling effect. Pretend to remove flame by pinching it with thumb and finger. Actually, flame continues to burn, but below guard where it is out of sight. Return flame to lighter by tapping guard lightly with thumb and finger, as though replacing flame. The tap will cause flame to spring back into view. Or you can pretend to put flame in mouth, then blow it back to the lighter. The blast of air will restore the flame. Or you can whistle it...

R

Another technique is to move coin with tip of right forefinger. For example, left side is folded over coin which is held at the center by left thumb. As right hand folds lower flap upward, tip of right forefinger slides coin to H. Still another method is to fold up lower flap before coin is put in the paper. Coin is now apparently placed in the center of this fold but actually goes outside the flap where it is held by left thumb as right hand folds down the top, then the two sides. A classic...

Pool Table

An English book, Fun on the Billiard Table by Stancliffe, is supposed to contain 75 easy stunts, but I have not seen a copy. Most of the following tricks are from a chapter on pool table stunts in A. Frederick Collin's Mirth and Mystery, 1931. Other references include Newman Mord, Tricks on the Billiard Table, and Fred Herrmann, Tricks and Games on the Pool Table (a Dover 1967 reprint of a 1902 book, Fun on the Pool Table). 1. Problem Place tip of finger on ball and by pressing down, cause ball...

VS09

Push a thumbtack into base of match. If balanced on wrist (Fig. 509) directly over pulse, the match will wobble slightly with each pulse beat, providing a visual pulse indicator. 13. Each time you try to light your cigarette, the match goes out mysteriously. Accomplished by blowing through your nose. If a piece of flash paper is inserted in end of cigarette, you can touch head of blown-out match to it and it will ignite, lighting cigarette. 14. Hold a burning match a few inches above your...

Thumbs Go Into Pocket And Turn Roll Inside Out Until Ends Show

'HOLDING BODY, PULL THE ENDS OUT GENTLY. Stewart Judah had a brilliant idea that adds so much to the presentation of the mouse that I have carried a watchwinder in my pocket ever since Judah mentioned it in the New Phoenix, No. 319, in 1954. After making the mouse, explain that you now have to wind him up to make him jump. Reach into your pocket for the key, coming out with the winder palmed but pretending to hold an invisible key between thumb and finger. Pretend to push the key into side of...

Zoo

Ing center die to fall, then quickly bring remaining two dice together again. Can also be done with four or more cubes,allowing all but two end ones to faU. 14a. There are numerous juggling flourishes, not difficult, with dice and cup. See Phoenix, July 10, 1953, for Kirk Stiles' explanation of how to place die on bottom of inverted cup, toss both in air so that cup revolves and you catch it, the die falling into it. For similar jugglery, see Roger Montandon's letter to Stiles in January 8...

A

Do paddle move to show both sides then a quick half-turn followed by a paddle move again. Both B pieces seem to have jumped down the blade toward A (Fig. 471). Left thumb slides B back to center of blade. At same time, forefinger beneath blade slides B up close to C. Repeat former procedure to make B appear to jump toward C on both sides (Fig. 472). Left thumb slides B back to center while forefinger beneath the blade slides C down close to B. Instead of showing this last change, however, hold...

1

If a rectangular sheet is folded as in Fig. 682, a single cut along dotted line AB in the last drawing will form nine separate pieces. (If you prefer, you can eliminate the last fold and make two cuts along dotted lines CD and EF in the next to last drawing.) One piece opens up as a large cross (Fig. 683-A) and the other pieces can be arranged. (Fig. 683-B) to make the word Hell. The stunt has been described often and with many different patter versions. Usual story is...

Pencil

Magician places his palm on top of pencil (lying on table), quickly raises hand to vertical position. Pencil remains clinging to palm (Fig. 739). Persons with naturally moist palms can usually do this at any time. The fleshy mounds at base of fingers are pressed firmly against pencil, then hand raised quickly. If hand is dry, moisten the mounds with saliva and massage before showing. Wooden hexagonal pencil works best. For suspension methods in which pressure is secretly applied by fingers, see...

Tennis Ball

Stewart James' Love-Sick Tennis Ball, TOPS, Dec., 1940. Ball is placed in a box, open at one end. Magician stands across room, utters the mating call of the tennis ball. Ball rolls out of box, across table, drops on floor and rolls to his feet. Ball has a pin hole that lets air escape when you push with thumb to form a depression. The depression allows ball to remain on a slope until it slowly regains its rotundity which starts it rolling. A large unprepared box placed on its side, back end...

Stocking

Finger ring is dropped into sock, end of sock knotted. Performer removes ring. Ring is switched for wire gimmick (see RING, No.6) which is worked through cloth, switched back to ring. 2. Wear a sock of one color on one leg, sock of another color on other leg. WTien someone notices it, say, Yes, and the funny thing about it is that I've got another pair at home just like this one. An oldie, but still funny. 1. Kolar's straw trick. Straw is previously prepared by making three-inch slit with razor...

Crayon

Spectator places a colored crayon in small box and gives to performer behind his back. Performer divines color of crayon. Method face audience, open box behind back, scratch crayon with thumb nail. Bring closed box to front and pretend to look through sides with X-ray eyes. Color on nail tells you color of crayon. 2. Crayons are shaken in hat and hat held above performer's vision. Performer names color, then removes crayon of that color. This continues until all crayons are removed. Secret...

Cigarette Paper

The Blue Bug, by Sidney Fleischman and Robert Gunther, is on cigarette paper magic. 1. Paper is torn, rolled into tiny ball, and restored. Repeat with phony explanation, showing extra ball, switching balls, etc., and sucker finish as both balls are shown whole. The advantage of cigarette paper is that small size permits clean get-away of torn pieces in mouth. The ball is placed in mouth under cover of a gesture of moistening fingertip to facilitate opening the ball in view....

Tissue Paper

Performer tears a piece of colored tissue to form one or more small paper butterflies. By means of a fan he causes them to flutter here and there, settle momentarily on flowers or on the fan, elude attempts at capture with his free hand, etc. They may fly into a box, magician closes lid, but when box is opened, out they fly again. For a climax, they may fly into candle flame and be consumed, or go up in a flash if formed from flash paper they may be seized by performer...

DICEDate

A number of books deal with conjuring with dice - Eddie Mario's Shoot the Works, Diversions with Dice, by the English magician, Treborix, and Audley Walsh, Dice Dexterity, Of the many books about methods of cheating with dice, the latest and best is, of course, Scarne on Dice, 1945 by John Scarne and Clayton Rawson. An anonymous and undated 16-page pamphlet, How to Control Fair Dice, distributed by the houses which supply crooked gambling equipment, is worth noting for its descriptions of...

Tg6f5

Four matches are placed on table to form a square (Fig. 615). Problem lift them with the ends of two other matches. Most people attempt this by pushing the ends against the square at points marked A. The lift can only be achieved, however, by placing the ends at points marked B. 64. Dexterity test. Five matches are placed on table. Pick up first match between tips of thumbs, next match between tips of first fingers, and so on until all five are held as in Fig. 616. Then replace them one at...

Zo

See Rice, More Naughty Silks, No. 16. The flourish quickly ties a knot resembling a necktie four-in-hand. 71. Problem hold hank by opposite ends and tie knots without letting go of either end. Solutions (1) Tie either of the wrist knots described above (Nos. 68 and 69). (2) Stretch hank on table, or have spectator hold it by opposite ends. Fold your arms, seize an end in each hand, then unfold arms to form knot. (3) Have spectator hold hank so it hangs in a loop,...

Book Test Magic Using Carbon Paper

A book can be used in place of coin tray. The extra coins are in the spine of book, in the opening between the cover and the cloth which binds the pages. Book is opened in center and coins are counted onto the pages. When coins are dumped into spectator's hands, the extra coins slide out of the spine (Fig. 34). 2. Carbon paper on underside of book jacket, with COMMENTS AND ADDITIONS paper beneath, offers a simple substitute for gim- micked clip board. Spectator is handed book to Source- use as...

Vanishing Dollar Bill Verify Name At

Left hand pushes pencil through the shell, which is then unrolled to show creamer has vanished. Left hand retrieves creamer from lap, brings it up under coat and pretends to extract it from inner coat pocket. 10. Berland's vanishing bill. Two bills are folded and held by the corners. As right hand palms off one bill, left thumb adjusts the other (which has been folded in a special manner) so it appears to be two. When this bill is shaken open, the effect is an...

Ig rr

To bend cigarette double without breaking. Place in hps long enough for end to become slightly moist, then remove and gesture with cigarette as you request light. Under cover of gesture, reverse ends. Moistened end is lit. After a few drags the tobacco will be moist throughout, and you can bend the cigarette double, or even into S shape. Straighten it and continue smoking. No one else is able to duplicate feat. (Bill Nord's handling). 45. To smoke cigarette without placing in mouth. Cup...

Egg

To balance egg on end, form small pile of salt, balance egg on it, then gently blow salt away. A few invisible grains will remain and keep egg balanced, puzzling spectators who do not see preparation. According to legend, Columbus solved this problem by placing egg on end with such force that shell cracked slightly, enabling him to balance it. If egg is shaken vigorously to break yolk, it sometimes can be balanced on the broad end without cracking shell. See Life, April 9, 1945, for pictures of...

Match Hcad Umxr Thumb

Ward, of Dewsbury, England, called my attention to this little known trick. Place a box on its edge, holding it firmly with left hand as in Fig. 587. One match is wedged between drawer and cover as shown, and second match leaned against it. Pretend to wrap an invisible thread around the head of leaning match. When you jerk the imaginary thread toward you, the leaning match suddenly topples over in the direction indicated by arrow. This is caused by pressing left thumb firmly against...

Balloon

For methods of forming animals quickly with small colored balloons, as well as other balloon tricks, the following books may be consulted Don Alan, The Rubber Circus U. F. Grant and others, Balloon Side Show Van Dyke, Fun with Balloons Dwight Damon, Balloonatic and Bal-loonatrix Jim Sommers, Blow by Blow Jimmy Davis, One Balloon Zoo Jack Denner-lein, New Twists for Balloon Workers. 1. Child's toy. Form a chain of rubber bands and attach to balloon. Loop end of chain to middle finger and use as...

Nail File

A small nail file which folds into a colored plastic case is currently on sale in most dime stores. With it a curious trick, based on centrifugal force, can be performed. It is necessary first to loosen the blade so it opens and closes without binding. To do this, dip the end of the case in very hot water to soften the plastic, then twist the blade from side to side until it moves loosely at the spot where a rivet attaches it to the case. The trick consists in closing the file in such a way...

Paper Clip

Paper Clip Also Called Jerk

Grant published a manuscript of eleven pages on paper clip tricks. It was titled C.L.I.P. Most of the tricks required special preparation or equipment that took them out of impromptu category. 1. The dollar bill and paper clip trick that swept the magic world in 1954 apparently originated with Bill Bowman of Seattle, Washington. It first appeared in print in issue No. 310 of The New Phoenix June, 1954. Two clips are attached to a bill as in Fig. 729. When bill is pulled straight,...

Right Hand Over Back Of Left

KEEP PENCIL between thl m8 crotches. In making these moves the pencil is gripped firmly at all times by crotch of right thumb while crotch of left thumb slides around it. Pencil rotates counterclockwise as you look down. Try bringing pencil up in this manner, then bring it down again not by reversing the same move, but by making a mirror-image of this move. In other words, the pencil rotates in a continuous counterclockwise motion as it moves up and then...

Newspaper

Many newspaper tricks require such elaborate preparation that they cannot be considered impromptu. The torn and restored newspaper, introduced by Al Baker, is a good example. Also, cut and restored newspaper strips such as the trick sold under the name of Clippoand Jesse Schim-mel's effect in HMM, Nov., 1953 which require preparation with rubber cement. Newspaper Magic, by Gene Anderson and Frances Marshall Magic, Inc., 1968 , contains many items of an impromptu nature. Pat Page's TEN SECOND...

Ice

An ice cube floats in glass of water. Problem lift it with small piece of string. Must not touch cube with Fmgers, or knot string in any way. Solution lay string over ice cube Fig. 457 . Shake plenty of salt on top of cube. In a few moments, cube will freeze to string and can be lifted easily. Wooden match, toothpick, or rubber band may be substituted for string. 2. Imitation of Eskimo relieving himself at North Pole. Hold fist in front of fly and let two ice cubes pop out of hand. Johnny...

Shoelace

Numerous methods have been devised for cutting off the ends of a shoelace, then restoring it not strictly impromptu since they require the insertion of one shoelace inside another. An excellent early method, invented by John H. Percival and fust explained in H. Adrian Smith's typescript, Master Mysteries of 1933, is explained in Smith's later book, Superb Tricks, 1953, p. 43. 2. Magician removes his shoe, yanks on knot, and shoelace pulls free of shoe. Or knot is untied, Buster Keaton...