Chronicles

On rare occasions a magician will take

Thus, if the freely chosen card is a 6, then exactly 6 cards immediately appear between the Jacks.

On rare occasions a magician will take

Roy Walton Two Tricks a standard card plot, add new insight, and in the process develop a brilliant new effect. That the magician in this case is Roy Walton should come as no surprise.

Roy here suggests a new angle on the much-overworked sandwich trick, one that opens up entirely new possibilities with tricks of this type. Not incidentally, the methods are as clean and straightforward as the effects, amounting (almost) to self-working approac h e s.

The first effect might be called Trapped With A Difference. The second trick is one where cards jump from one sandwich to the other. Both are excellent. I'd like to thank Roy for making them available for publication here.

ected by a spectator and placed face-down on the table. A pair of ^acks is placed face-up on top of the pack. Instantly, a quantity of cards exactly equal to the value of the selected card appears between the Jacks.

Thus, if the freely chosen card is a 6, then exactly 6 cards immediately appear between the Jacks.

Method : Secretly arrange ten cards in numeric order from 10 to Ace (10 on top of the deck, 9 next, etc) and place them on top of the pack. The suits are of no importance and should be mixed. Remember the suit of the Ace. Place one card above the stack of ten.

Count Me In

The effect is this. A card is freely sel- Run throucjh the ^ce-up pack and remove the first Jack you come to, placing it face-down below the pack. Continue look ing through the pack for the remaining Jack of the same colour and place this one also face-down below the pack.

Whilst the pack is still in a face-up spread condition look for the Ace you remembered and close the pack, keeping a break above the remembered Ace. Turn the pack face-down, maintaining the break which should be below the top thirteen cards of the pack. The pack is held face-down in the left hand.

Bring the right hand over the pack, fingers at the far short end and thumb at the near end. Place the left thumb on the face of the uppermost face-up Jack.

Move the left hand towards the left, retaining the Jack on top of the pack by pressure with the left thumb and leaving apparently the other faceup Jack in the right hand. Really the top eleven cards of the deck plus the Jack are in the right hand. Keep the back of this packet aligned toward the spectator's view and he will not notice the thickness. Also, the thickness of this packet is concealed by the fingers of the right hand overlapping the outer short end.

Place the "Jack" in the right hand on top of the pack, no breaks now being held. The proceding action should be performed in a smooth, casual manner, just to show the two Jacks face-up on top of the face-down pack.

Lift up the top two cards of the pack with the right thumb tip at the near short end and remove them and put them on the table on top of the empty card case, so that they can be picked up easily later without having to spread them.

Apparently these two cards are the face-up Jacks, but really only the top card is face-up and a Jack, so at this point they must not be spread more than a border's width.

Start to deal cards from the top of the pack slowly onto the table into a face-down heap, inviting a spectator to stop you on any card. He must stop you within the first nine cards dealt. This is the reason for dealing slowly. Before dealing you may if you wish cut a few cards from the face of the pack to the top and time your dealing to hit into your stack before inviting a spectator to call stop. When he stops you, place the card aside face-down. Push the remainder of the dealt cards under or into the centre of the main pack.

Pick up the "face-up Jacks" and place them on top of the pack. Spread the top cards of the pack to show that the Jacks have caught a number of face-down cards between them. Count the face-down cards and then turn the selected card over to show that the values coincide.

Note that the Ace in the stack can be any card at all, but I find it easier to think of the stack as Ace to Ten.

The Ten To One Trick

(The trick where a card moves from a sandwich position between a pair of Aces to (say) a position between a pair of 10's is well known. But in the Walton trick here, a random block of cards jumps from one sandwich to the other

Sometime ago I experimented with tricks using a numeric stack in the pack. Two of the resulting tricks were "Palmist's Prophesy" and "Count Me In" There were one or two others and this is one of the one or two.

To prepare for the effect you'll need to arrange nine cards on top of the pack in numeric order from Ace to Nine. The Ace is the top card of the pack and the suits of the cards are of no importance. Place an indifferent card on top of the stack and you are ready to perform.

Run through the face-up pack and remove a pair of 10's and a pair of Aces, placing each pair face-up on the table. Take care that your stack is not disturbed.

Turn the pack face-down in the left hand. Say that as the values of the first pair are 10"s, you will put ten cards between them. Count off ten cards from the top of the pack into the right hand, taking each card below the previous one, so that the stack is retained in order.

Take the cards in a fairly untidy manner so that the right hand ends up holding ten cards in an unsquared state.

Get a left little finger break under the top card of the pack and square the right harwi cards by resting them on the pack for a second. Then lift them away wi.th the right hand, twisting the pack vertically with the left so that the right hand can tap the left long edge of its packet on top of the pack to complete the squaring.

Place the ten {really 11) cards face-down between the face-up 10's. Place one card face-down between the Aces, pointing out that as their value is 1, you will place one card between them.

Pick up the 10's packet from the table and place in on top of the pack. In this action get a left little finger break under the top faceup 10-spot. Cut the pack once, at the approximate center point and as the halves come together retake the break with the left little finger in standard Double Undercut fashion, the right â– thumb tip having carried the break to the centre in the cutting action.

Pick up the Ace packet from the table and place it on top of the pack, getting a left 3rd finger break under the top face-up Ace. Cut the pack once, cutting at the centre break point held by the left little finger and pressing the right thumb on the near short end to pick up the top card break in standard fashion.

As the halves come together pick up the break from the right thumb with the left little finger.

The effect is that each packet has been cut into the pack by a single cut. You end with the left little finger holding a break at the approximate centre of the pack, immediately below the top face-up Ace of the Ace group.

Now count the cards slowly frorr the top of the pack in a face-down heap on the table, inviting the spectator to stop you on any card. He must stop you before"you reach eleven.

When he says stop, hand the card to him and ask him to turn it face-up. As he does this, cut off the upper half of the pack with the right hand at the break point and use this half to scoop up the pile of face-down cards on the table so that as the two halves of the pack are brought together again at the end of the scooping action, these cards have been sandwiched between the two halves. No breaks are now held.

(I think what Roy means here is the following. The RH cuts off the upper half of the pack at the break, places this packet on top of the tabled packet, then lifts the combined packet up and replaces it on top of the LH portion of the deck. KF)

State that only the value of the selected card is important. Let's say-it's a 5-spot. Say that the Aces originally had one card between them but let's see what happened now.

Spread out the centre section of the pack so that the face-up Aces show. Remove the block of cards with a face-up Ace at each end and place them in a slight spread on the table, lifting the upper section of the pack into the right hand and retaining the lower in the left to do this.

Invite a spectator to count the face-down cards between the Aces. As he does this, quietly reassemble the main pack by placing the right-hand section below the left-hand one.

When he counts the cards he will find 6, so 5 (in our example) extra cards have appeared between the Aces. Say, "They must have come from somewhere. "

Spread the pack again and remove the block with a 10-spot face-up at each end. Have a spectator count the facedown cards between them. Conclude by saying, "So that's where they came from."

(It might add to the effect to begin with two Jokers instead of two Aces and have no cards between the Jokers. Then the value of the spectator's card would coincide exactly with the number of cards between the Jokers. Reader comment regarding a simple solution is welcome. KF)

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