Spellbound For Experts

Among experts this routine is generally conceded to be the strong, est and most deceptive version of the classic Victor Spellbound concept. It devastates magicians because at each step, when they think they know the method, their guesses are demolished in short order. The method is not easy, but if you want to devote time to learning the best handling for Spellbound, this is the routine to learn. Victor's original routine appeared in Magic Of The Hands in 1937. About ten years later Vernon...

Martin Gardner Boiling Point

In the same letter where he mentioned the Van Cleve trick, Miller Cravens brought up the subject of a trick Martin Gardner once put into print. The effect is that you fill an ordinary glass with water and cover it with a handkerchief. On command the water begins to boil. The audience sees the water boil. There is no gimmick. This reminded me of an addition I made to the effect. Some years back, when Bob Shvegzda asked for a contribution to his Magic Club News, this short-cuts, but they require...

Dai Vernon Frank Garcia

This started out as a gag, but it had an unexpected side-effect magicians who did not know Frank was using a gaffed coin had no idea how the trick was done. As a result, more serious thought was given to incorporating the gaffed coin into a Spellbound routine, and the following handling is the result. In trying to unravel who contributed what, a standard problem arose the routine goes back so far that no one could remember precisely who did what. Some of it is...

Chronicles

Effect by Karl Fulves, method by Derek Dingle. More specifically, I called Derek and said, I've got an effect. A few minutes later he called back and said, I've got a method. Here is the result The magician deals out three hands of draw poker. Turning up the dealer's hand, he shows that he has dealt himself the four Aces. The audience is not impressed since the magician obviously could have had the deck stacked to deliver the Aces. The magician says, Let's get rid of the Aces and deal out an...

Richard Durhams

(This fine close-up trick was a favorite of J. W. Sarles. In his hands it took on the proportions of a miniature illusion what the audience saw was a series of logical actions leading inexorably to a remarkable conclusion. It was also in the Stewart Judah repertoire. When the Judah Folios were being prepared I wanted to include it in the safety pin routine beginning on pg. 850,but could not locate Richard Durham in time. He was finally located thru the intervention of Sid Lorraine, and...

Edward Victors

About 1952 or 1953 Willane released, through his Methods For Miracles series, Edward Victor's Eleven Card Trick, one of the greatest of all impromptu card routines. In the years since, the Victor trick has attracted intermittent interest. Those who know the trick and actually use it tend to be those on the inside who trade good material but keep it sub rosa. In recent years in this country there has been a resurgence of interest in the 11-Card Trick, do mainly, I think, to the fact that Derek...

Notes

The Retrospective column in Chronicles 13 and 14 feature Durham's Pin Thru Hank and Victor's Eleven Card Trick, two outstanding routines that are among the best of their kind. It should be clear that Retrospective is not printed for the well-informed because they already know the material. It is published for the benefit of those who don't have ready access to high calibre out-of-print material that circulates thru inner circle conduits. The column is popular and attracts a good deal of mail....

Allen Lang

For a change of pace the magiciai has the spectator read the magician's mind. It uses a borrowed deck, no preparation. The magician removes four cards from the deck and places them in a face-down row on the table. He then turns up the top card of the deck. Say it is the JS. The magician says, One of the cards in the row matches the Jack of Spades. In other words, it is a black Jack. I'd like you to guess which card will produce a match. The spectator indicates one of the four cards. This card...

Tom Sellers Two Tricks

About twenty years ago this routine fooled a roomful of magicians. I was there and was completely taken in. As impressive as the effect was, the method evoked a stronger response because of the extreme simplicity of its construction. KF The performer drapes a silk handkerchief over a candlestick. Under this silk he places a billiard ball. A larger handkerchief is now placed over the silk, covering the ball. When the large handkerchief is remov--1230- ed, the billiard ball is seen to be on top...

Karl Fulves

You may have to try several rubber-bands until you find the right one. Apparently you are going to snap the rubber-band around the deck. As the RH places the band over the deck, the left 4th finger widens the break. The RH then slides the rubber-band over just the top half of the deck, Fig. 1. An exposed view is shown in Fig. 2. Note that from the front it will appear that you are merely snapping the band over the entire deck. As yet the audience does not know...

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Mitsunobu Matsuyama Paradox

The KD is cut into 5 pieces. The face-down pieces are then assembled to form the original card again, Fig. A. Now the pieces are turned face-up and the face-up KD is assembled. But where it took 5 pieces to form the facedown card, it takes only 4 pieces to form the face-up card The face-up KD is shown in Fig. B. The spectator himself may assemble the card as there is no trickery. The trick is self-working. You do not load in, steal out or switch pieces. You use just the...